The Whitlingham Bird Report for 2016 is now available to download here.

The previous reports are also availble: 2015 here,
2014 report here and the 2013 report here. Thanks to everyone who has contributed sightings, information and photos to these reports.

You may also be interested in Chris Durdin's Thorpe Marsh Wildlife Report for 2016, which is available here.

Whitlingham Species Guides


2015 marks ten years since I first started visiting Whitlingham and Thorpe. To mark this anniversary I am reworking my species pages into downloadable guides. Feel free to download these and print them off if you find them useful.

As always if you spot any mistakes, can add information or have seen something that I am not aware of then please email me (details on the main blog).

There won't be a guide for birds, as Justin & I are hoping to compose that one in book form.

I have so far completed the following guides, which you can now download.
Whitlingham Mammal Guide Updated 25/12/15 - Harvest Mouse added
Whitlingham Butterfly Guide Updated 21/08/15
Whitlingham Dragonfly & Damselfly Guide Updated 31/08/15 - other thorax colours of Blue-tailed Damselfly now included
Whitlingham Grasshopper & Cricket Guide 22/08/15
Whitlingham Macro Moth checklist 21/08/15
Whitlingham Micro Moth Guide 25/08/15
Whitlingham Fungi Guide - Part 1 (Bracket Fungi) 25/08/15
Whitlingham Plant Galls 25/08/15
Whitlingham Flowering Plants - Checklist 12/07/15
Whitlingham Shieldbugs & allies Guide 08/10/15 - adult Hawthorn Shieldbug added
Whitlingham Hoverflies Guide 09/07/16 - New species and photos added

Whitlingham Ladybirds Guide 25/08/15

 Latest guide:





2 comments:

  1. Thank you for this site James. Very nicely done and bookmarked. I am often there with my camera. I note in your bird guide that you have spotted Arctic Terns (in 2010). I think, I saw an Arctic Tern on UEA Broad last week - have you heard of any other sitings recently? Good luck with your Bird Guide book! Pat

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    1. Hi Pat, thanks very much for your comment. Any terns seen inland around this time are highly likely to be Common Terns. There are currently three at Whitlingham and I saw some at Ormesby yesterday. Arctic Terns are only seen inland on passage. At Whitlingham as far as I know all of the records have been from April/May. At UEA and Colney GPs there are occasionally reports of birds migrating back in mid-August, but I don't think there has been any seen in July.

      Common and Arcitc Terns can be tricky to separate as summer progresses, if you are interested the BTO produced a video a while back with some useful tips: http://www.bto.org/news-events/news/2011-06/latest-id-video-%E2%80%93-common-and-arctic-tern

      All the best,
      James

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