The Whitlingham Bird Report 2017 can be viewed or downloaded here. For previous years (2012-2016) see the links on the Whitlingham Bird List page.

You may also be interested in Chris Durdin's Thorpe Marsh Wildlife Report for 2017, which is available http://www.honeyguide.co.uk/documents/ThorpeMarshesWildlifeReport2017.pdf

Whitlingham & East Norfolk

2nd January 2010
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Gary's bid to take the Norfolk yearlist title began on the 1st with a commendable 107 species, but he still needed some Whitlingham goodies. We got there about 9, and soon refound the Black-necked Grebe, Goosander and Great Northern Diver, a now famous trio. Whilst we were there a redhead Smew was seen briefly, so we decided to stick around to try and relocate it. In doing so, Gary found a female Ruddy Duck, my first Whitlingham tick of 2010. RBA didn't put it out, so we told some other birders onsite, and eventually we saw the Smew too. Bonza.
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We then proceeded to take a tour around the east of the county, aiming to see some winter wildfowl before it buggers off. First stop, Cantley, where we found the White-fronted Geese and Taiga Bean Geese, along with a couple of Marsh Harriers. Two Chinese Water Deer were also mooching about. Next stop, Strumpshaw. We heard a redpoll calling, and tracked it to the woods - Lesser Redpoll. Also in the woods, GS Woodpecker, Nuthatch and lots of Marsh Tits. After scanning each one, a thick-necked individual showing the white cheek area and buff flanks of Willow Tit. Wanting to be sure, we waited until it called. Whilst listening to a recorded version, the Willow Tit flew onto the path next to us, responding to the call with some Willow Tit beats of its own. A session in the fen hide saw us record lots of ice.
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We arrived at Wroxham Broad, and along with Bob Cobbold and Andy Kane we stood in the scrub by the fence waiting for the Ring-necked Duck to emerge from the Yacht Club. Bob had gone by the time Gary picked it up. It had been in front of us for a little while, but remained asleep. We headed to a heavily frozen Barton where the male Ferruginous Duck was still around, although spending most of its time behind a reedy spit. We cut through Ludham and scanned the Bewick's Swan flock, picking out a few Whooper Swans.
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We ended the day at Stubb Mill, although it was already gloomy. A flyover Yellowhammer was a year tick, and a steady stream of Cranes flew in. Many Marsh Harriers, but no sign of any Hen Harriers or Merlin. A Little Egret and a Barn Owl flew through, last bird of the day was Woodcock, with at least 5 flying out of the trees.

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